Coffee, deforestation and new supply chains

Coffee, deforestation and new supply chains

It's August, and it's about coffee, and specifically about sustainability in coffee (two of my favourite topics) so for the first time we are highlighting a conference.

It's August, and it's about coffee, and specifically about sustainability in coffee (two of my favourite topics) so for the first time we are highlighting a conference. After we posted our Sunday Brunch on premiumisation and the coffee industry, the organisers of the World Coffee Summit, being held in London on the 13th Sept 2023, got in touch.

Sunday Brunch: premiumisation as a sustainability strategy?
Your premium brand had better be delivering something special, or it’s not going to get the business.- Warren Buffett 💡Sunday Brunch is taking a break for August - see you in early September Not a member yet? Click here, its free. Can a premium coffee brand help the farmers

To be clear, we have nothing to do with organising this conference, and we have no financial interest. But, it looks both topical and interesting. So, if you are interested in sustainability in coffee - have a look, especially if, like me, you come from the financial world.

World Coffee Summit 2023
A face-to-face Coffee Summit Exhibition on September 13, 2023


The details

Sustainability in coffee

Over the last few months, we have been writing about coffee. This is not (just) because I love coffee, but more practically, the coffee sustainability challenge has a massive read across for other agricultural and natural capital issues.


Why this is important

Lets start at the top with supply, and how it's likely to be impacted in a world of climate change. According to a report from Dr Richardson et al "global coffee production is at risk from synchronous crop failures, characterised by widespread concurrent reductions in yield occurring in multiple countries at the same time". Or putting this is plain English, climate change looks like it's going to alter where we can grow coffee, with the area of suitable land potentially being reduced by up to 50%. Rising temperatures are the main driver, but changes in rainfall and seasonality are also important.

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