What caught our eye

Developments that we found particularly interesting during the week and why.

Steven Bowen
Members Public

A positive story about coal mines

Could abandoned coal mines be a useful energy source to heat our homes? Local politicians in the west of England, working with the Coal Authority (the public body that manages the effects of historic coal mining) believe so. West of England coalmines to be mapped for renewable energy potentialRegional mayor

Sandy Jayaraj
Members Public

A new wee test for bowel cancer?

Colorectal cancer or bowel cancer is the third most common cancer globally and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths (after lung cancer). Europe has the highest death rate with an age-standardised rate of 12 per 100,000 (2022) across all ages and sexes and accounted for almost 28%

Steven Bowen
Members Public

Supply chains - will the European regulation work?

It's well known that Europe is active in introducing regulation to ensure that products being sold in the region meet minimum human rights and environmental standards. Many companies are already preparing for the new rules and by and large the new rules are well supported by the general

Steven Bowen
Members Public

Tracking concrete technology developments

Among the various organisations interested in lower carbon concrete is, unsurprisingly, the Institution of Structural Engineers. Concrete is a massively important building material. But, as they say "publicly available information about these technologies is often limited and inconsistent, making it difficult to draw comparisons with conventional concrete." Which

Steven Bowen
Members Public

Electricity ducks being seen in Spain

Sandy Jayaraj
Members Public

Radical food system overhaul could deliver US$10 trillion per year in benefits

A report from the Food System Economics Commission (FSEC) argues that the current set up of food systems globally (i.e. what food we grow, how we grow it and how we distribute it to people) has a cost far bigger than their contribution to global prosperity and is on

Steven Bowen
Members Public

An 'Industrial Revolution' for efficient buildings?

The European Energy Performance of Buildings Directive could create a massive investment opportunity.

Sandy Jayaraj
Members Public

Blood test could revolutionise Alzheimer's diagnosis

An existing commercially available blood test could identify Alzheimer's risk early.

Sandy Jayaraj
Members Public

UK declares national incident as measles cases soar

Between 1st October 2023 and 18th January 2024 (15 weeks), there have been 216 confirmed and 103 probable cases of measles in the West Midlands (a region in the UK) with the majority of cases among children under the age of 10. It has prompted the UK Health Security Agency

Sandy Jayaraj
Members Public

Could EVs potentially have a much longer working life than ICEs?

Motoring journalist Quentin Wilson posted an interesting discussion topic on LinkedIn about EVs. Quentin Willson on LinkedIn: Following my post on extending the working life of EV batteries through… | 130 commentsFollowing my post on extending the working life of EV batteries through repair and cell replacement, I wonder if EVs

Sandy Jayaraj
Members Public

Do soil carbon-sucking projects deserve the credit they get?

A story over the holiday period that caught our eye in New Zealand publication Stuff was one discussing carbon dioxide (carbon) storage in soil. The article highlighted Australian agricultural start up Loam Bio that produces a fungal and bacterial seed coating which boosts plants' ability to absorb carbon into

Steven Bowen
Members Public

Critical minerals - will we have enough?

Kathryn Porter, who writes the Watt Logic blogs, recently did a two part detailed dive into the potential demand from the sustainability transitions for critical minerals. Part 1 sets the scene in some detail. In Part 2, the blog we are highlighting, she looks at the supply situation for two