Ooh ah, just a little bit - transition is a series of steps
(Photo by Adrian from Pixabay)

Ooh ah, just a little bit - transition is a series of steps

The thing with sustainability transitions is that whilst there is a starting point, there is no end point. The world is a continually changing place and we are continually transitioning.

Summary: Transition is a series of steps: stages, individual action & nudges (and their limitations). Training for a triathlon and transitioning in sustainability have many parallels. There are barriers to change: nirvana fallacy, bite-sized content and binaries and when balanced journalism causes an imbalance. Small steps and nudges can be effective. Examples discussed include preventing conflicts between cyclists and cars, how 'superpower satsumas' helped kids to eat more healthily, picking no sugar drinks options at McDonald's, wasting less food through measurement, and using less 'small power'.

Why this is important: Perfect can be the enemy of good. However, we can't teleport to the ideal. We need to make the right sequential moves to get there.

The big theme: The thing with sustainability transitions is that whilst there is a starting point, there is no end point. The world is a continually changing place and we are continually transitioning. Getting from walking to completing a triathlon doesn't happen overnight. The same is true in sustainability. It's a series of steps.



The details


The thing with sustainability transitions is that whilst there is a starting point, there is no end point. The world is a continually changing place and we are continually transitioning.

In this blog I shall discuss:

  • Training for a triathlon and transitioning in sustainability
  • Transition is a series of steps: stages, individual action and nudges
  • Some barriers to change: nirvana fallacy, bite-sized content and binaries and when balanced journalism causes an imbalance
  • Some examples of where nudges have been effective: preventing conflicts between cyclists and cars, encouraging kids to eat more healthily in schools, picking no sugar drinks options at McDonald's, wasting less food and using less 'small power'.

This post is for subscribers only

Subscribe
Already have an account? Log in